Archive for the ‘Intersecting Law & Languages Blog’ Category

Suzanne Deliscar to Share Insights in OBA Panel Discussion for “Enterprising Lawyer” Program- October 4, 2017

Posted on: September 27th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar will share her insights in a panel discussion about launching your own practice at an upcoming Ontario Bar Association (OBA) “Enterprising Lawyer” program.

On Oct. 4, “Module 4 — keys to launching your own practice,” part of the OBA’s “Enterprising lawyer: taking care of business series A: starting your own firm” program will explore a practical “how-to” approach to setting up the essential building blocks of a practice.

Deliscar, founder of Deliscar Professional Corporation, and her fellow panellists will discuss topics such as LSUC bookkeeping rules for lawyers engaging in real estate, corporate-commercial, family law and commercial litigation, a detailed risk analysis of how and when you can or should charge contingency fees, various types of LawPro coverage that you need for your practice and how transaction levies work. Speakers will also participate in a candid Q&A session.

The session will run from 6 – 8 p.m, including the Q&A period, at Twenty Toronto Street Conferences and Events, located at 20 Toronto St., 2nd floor, in Toronto, or via live webcast.

For more information, click here.

“Ask the Lawyer Day” on Family Law for Elspeth Heyworth Centre for Women – October 3, 2017

Posted on: September 27th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

On Oct. 3, Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar will present a free ‘Ask the Lawyer’ day program at the Elspeth Heyworth Centre for Women discussing family law in Ontario.

From 11 a.m. – noon, Deliscar, founder of Deliscar Professional Corporation, will answer legal questions on the family law process, how to resolve disputes, the steps in the court process and how to find help.

The event will take place at 2350 Finch Ave. W., Unit D, in Toronto.

For more information, click here.

“Ask the Lawyer” Day on Wills & Powers of Attorney for Alzheimer Society of Peel – September 26, 2017

Posted on: September 23rd, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar will present a free ‘Ask the Lawyer’ day program at the Alzheimer Society of Peel this month, to share her insights on wills and powers of attorney.

On Sept. 26 from 11 a.m. – noon, Deliscar, founder of Deliscar Professional Corporation, will answer legal questions on wills and powers of attorney, including why you need a will, what happens if you don’t have one, what are powers of attorney and why they are important.

The event will take place at 385 Brunel Rd. in Mississauga.

For more information, click here.

Google Translate no substitute for court interpreters

Posted on: September 14th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

All participants in the justice system need to be aware of the interpretation needs of parties who come before the courts, says Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar.

The U.K.’s Law Gazette reports on the confusion over who bears responsibility for interpretation services during a hearing involving a Mandarin-speaking woman in the north of England accused of various food hygiene breaches at her restaurant.

The Gazette says a barrister uninvolved with the case stepped in when the defendant was left without an interpreter, downloading the Google Translate app in an effort to allow her to communicate with the court.

“It’s kind of unbelievable that something like this could happen. The case really shouldn’t have gone ahead at all,” Deliscar tells AdvocateDaily.com.

“It’s very important that we safeguard access to justice and fairness, and part of that comes from ensuring all parties have the ability to communicate their thoughts and understand what’s going on,” adds Deliscar, who runs Deliscar Professional Corporation, a law firm that offers services in English, French and Spanish.

The post continues at http://www.advocatedaily.com/suzanne-deliscar-google-translate-no-substitute-for-court-interpreters.html.

ONLINE COURSES TACKLE LEGAL CORRESPONDENCE AND CONTRACTS WEBINARS FOR LINGUISTS – September 21 & 28, 2017

Posted on: September 11th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

ONLINE COURSES TACKLE LEGAL CORRESPONDENCE AND CONTRACTS WEBINARS FOR LINGUISTS – September 21 & 28, 2017

Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar will share her insights on the language of legal correspondence and contracts with linguists via a two-part webinar series this month.

Presented in partnership with ProZ.com, the first session, The Language of Legal Correspondence: Reading and Understanding Legal Communications, will be held September 21, 2017 at 10 a.m. to noon.

In this advanced course, Deliscar, founder of Deliscar Professional Corporation, will analyze the structure of legal correspondence to assist legal translators. The webinar is designed for experienced translators who will learn how to draft legal correspondence in their target language(s).

The course will include instruction on: how to effectively frame and organize legal writing; basic grammar and style rules such as using correct grammar to enhance clarity; using plain language; complex language structures in legal documents; the use of the passive voice; reported speech and common collocations in legal discourse; prepositions; and the structuring of pleadings, advice letters, legal opinions, letters-before-action, reports, memorandums, emails and legal briefs.

At the end of the course, attendees will be able to identify the various standard components in legal correspondence.

The second part of the series, The Language of Contracts: Reading and Understanding Contracts, will take place on September 28, 2017 at 10 a.m. This two-hour course will dissect the standard clauses and terminology found in contracts, as well as analyze the structure of contracts to assist legal translators.

The course will include instruction on: the language of contracts, reading and understanding contracts and standard contract clauses; effectively using shall, shall not, must and will; words and phrases that don’t belong in legal documents; archaic terms in legal English (hereinafter, therein, etc.) and other terms of reference and word formation; keeping contract provisions readable and clear (reducing average sentence length); how to organize a contract and use definitions effectively; and identifying conditional contract clauses.

At the end of this course, attendees will be able to identify the various standard clauses in a contract.

Each webinar has been approved for two American Translators Association Continuing Education points.

Each two-hour course is US$99, however, special bundle pricing of US$178 is available for early registrants.

Registration links for both courses can be accessed here.

Francophone driver challenges speeding ticket from Anglophone officer

Posted on: August 10th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

Language rights can get complicated when federal bodies operate in unilingual provinces, says Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar.

The Winnipeg Free Press reports that a local Francophone lawyer is challenging a speeding ticket on the basis that rights afforded to him under the Charter and the Official Languages Act were breached when he was stopped by an RCMP officer who could not speak French and wrote the ticket out in English only.

“If you look across the country, Quebec is traditionally French speaking, and New Brunswick is bilingual, but the rest of the provinces, including Manitoba, are officially English-speaking,” Deliscar tells AdvocateDaily.com.

“The interesting thing here is that the RCMP is a federal body that is required to provide bilingual services, so that is a clash that will have to be addressed,” adds Deliscar, who runs Deliscar Professional Corporation, a law firm that offers services in English, French and Spanish.

According to the Free Press, the lawyer in the case, who has argued language rights matters involving Franco-Manitobans at the Supreme Court of Canada during a 30-year career, was pulled over in St-Pierre-Jolys last summer.

While the town has an officially designated bilingual RCMP detachment, the paper says the officer who handed out the ticket is actually based at a nearby station which doesn’t have the same language requirements.

RCMP spokesperson Tara Seel told the Free Press that despite its limited obligation to provide bilingual officers at certain detachments, it will also provide service in French on demand anywhere in the province.

Read the rest of the post here: http://www.advocatedaily.com/suzanne-deliscar-francophone-driver-challenges-speeding-ticket-from-anglophone-officer.html

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN: “AUTHENTICATION OF OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS” – September 13, 2017

Posted on: August 10th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

 

The “Authentication of Official Documents II” course is the second course in the “Authentication of Official Documents” series designed to provide official documents translators with an understanding of their role in the translation and preparation of official documents, including learning about the following topics:

1. What are Official Documents?
2. What is a Certified Translation? – An International Perspective?
3. What Happens When an Official Document Translation is sent Abroad?
4. How are Official Documents Prepared for Use Abroad?
Option 1: The “Apostille” System:1961 Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents
Option 2: Notarization/Certification – Authentication – Legalization Process

5. The Role of Notaries Public, Notaries, Lawyers, and Commissioners of Oaths
6. How to Add Additional Income Streams from Providing Authentication-Related Services

At the end of this course, official document translators will have learned about their role in the authentication of official documents process, as well have in-depth knowledge as to how official documents must be prepared in order to be accepted in foreign countries.

Register for this course to be held on September 13, 2017 at 10 AM EST at the following link: http://www.proz.com/translator-training/course/14951-authentication_of_official_documents_ii.

Attendees are encouraged to attend the “Authentication of Official Documents” webinar first, now available on-demand at http://www.proz.com/translator-training/course/13708-authentication_of_official_documents (originally presented on June 30, 2016).

 

 

Bilingual Ottawa bill could cause legal problems

Posted on: July 22nd, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

A provincial law to officially recognize the bilingualism of Ottawa may not be necessary, says Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar.

Liberal MPP Nathalie Des Rosiers recently introduced private member’s Bill 140, which would amend the City of Ottawa Act to require the municipality to make a bylaw for bilingual administration and services.

But Deliscar, principal of Deliscar Professional Corporation, a law firm that offers services in English, French and Spanish, questions the need for the law.

“It seems like it’s just a way to formalize something that is already happening,” she tells AdvocateDaily.com. “I think the challenge would be that there could be some cost issues in making sure that everything was accessible in French.

“It’s an interesting case because it is the nation’s capital, but it’s in a province that is not officially bilingual. I think the city effectively is bilingual anyway because you have this massive civil service based there. If you want to work for the federal government, there is an expectation to speak both languages, and most federal politicians know some French,” Deliscar adds.

This article continues here: http://www.advocatedaily.com/areas-of-law/suzanne-deliscar-bilingual-ottawa-bill-could-cause-legal-problems.html

Tax court judge violated witnesses’ language rights

Posted on: July 10th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar 1 Comment

Federally-appointed judges would benefit from education on the linguistic rights of litigants and witnesses appearing before them, says Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar.

In a recent case, the Federal Court of Appeal overturned a Tax Court decision after finding the judge violated the official language rights of an insurance company’s lawyer and its witnesses by ignoring their wishes to testify and communicate in French because they were bilingual, while another party in the case spoke only English fluently.

“I think judges, especially at the federal level, have to be educated about the rights of litigants to speak whichever of the official languages they wish. If interpreters are needed, then they ought to be provided,” Deliscar tells AdvocateDaily.com.

“It’s not something you can reach some compromise on,” adds the principal of Deliscar Professional Corporation, a law firm that offers services in English, French and Spanish.

She says some judges may have risen to the bench after long careers in private practice where language rights were never an issue, especially if they practised in a primarily unilingual jurisdiction.

“It’s not as if these issues come up every day, and they may never have crossed a judge’s mind,” Delsicar says.

The tax case involved a self-represented individual appealing the minister’s assessment of his employment with an insurance company during the year 2012. His former employer intervened, and several representatives were called to testify in court.

This article continues here: http://www.advocatedaily.com/suzanne-deliscar-tax-court-judge-violated-witnesses-language-rights.html

Online courses tackle legal correspondence and contracts webinars for linguists – July 20 & 27, 2017

Posted on: July 6th, 2017 by Suzanne Deliscar Add A Comment

Brampton lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar will share her insights on the language of legal correspondence and contracts with linguists via a two-part webinar series this month.

Presented in partnership with ProZ.com, the first session, The Language of Legal Correspondence: Reading and Understanding Legal Communications, will be held July 20 at 10 a.m. to noon.

In this advanced course, Deliscar, founder of Deliscar Professional Corporation, will analyze the structure of legal correspondence to assist legal translators. The webinar is designed for experienced translators who will learn how to draft legal correspondence in their target language(s).

The course will include instruction on: how to effectively frame and organize legal writing; basic grammar and style rules such as using correct grammar to enhance clarity; using plain language; complex language structures in legal documents; the use of the passive voice; reported speech and common collocations in legal discourse; prepositions; and the structuring of pleadings, advice letters, legal opinions, letters-before-action, reports, memorandums, emails and legal briefs.

At the end of the course, attendees will be able to identify the various standard components in legal correspondence.

The second part of the series, The Language of Contracts: Reading and Understanding Contracts, will take place on May 25 at 10 a.m. This two-hour course will dissect the standard clauses and terminology found in contracts, as well as analyze the structure of contracts to assist legal translators.

The course will include instruction on: the language of contracts, reading and understanding contracts and standard contract clauses; effectively using shall, shall not, must and will; words and phrases that don’t belong in legal documents; archaic terms in legal English (hereinafter, therein, etc.) and other terms of reference and word formation; keeping contract provisions readable and clear (reducing average sentence length); how to organize a contract and use definitions effectively; and identifying conditional contract clauses.

At the end of this course, attendees will be able to identify the various standard clauses in a contract.

Each webinar has been approved for two American Translators Association Continuing Education points.

Each two-hour course is US$99, however, special bundle pricing of US$178 is available for early registrants.

Registration links for both courses can be accessed here.

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